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How Much Sleep Does a Senior Need?

Sleep Does a Senior Need

Senior citizens are one of the fastest growing demographics in America. Seniors face many challenges when it comes to their health and well-being, but one that is often overlooked is sleep. Seniors need sleep just like everyone else, but they may not be getting as much as they should. In this blog post, we will discuss how much sleep seniors need and what steps can be taken to help them get more restful sleep each night.

A common misconception is that seniors don’t need as much sleep. Seniors, like all people, need at least seven hours of restful sleep each night, and they may even benefit from more than the recommended amount. Seniors often have a harder time getting to sleep and staying asleep because their circadian rhythm starts shifting in later years. Once Seniors get to sleep, their deep sleep cycles may also change. Seniors are not as efficient at getting the restful REM sleep they need, so it is important for them to make up for this by taking naps or going to bed earlier.

What Keeps Seniors Awake At Night?

Seniors may have a harder time going to sleep because they are less active during the day. Seniors should maintain an exercise routine in order to combat this problem. Seniors who live alone or lack social interaction throughout the day often find it difficult to fall asleep and stay asleep at night as well, so staying connected with friends and family is important for their health. Seniors also need more deep sleep than younger adults due to changes in their circadian rhythm over time, so getting enough restful REM sleep each night becomes even more critical when seniors age.

  • Senior citizens are one of the fastest growing demographics in America
  • Seniors require at least seven hours of restful sleep each night just like everyone else but many don’t get that much
  • Seniors often have a harder time falling asleep and staying asleep because their circadian rhythm starts shifting in later years
  • Seniors are not as efficient at getting the restful REM sleep they need, so it is important for them to take naps or go to bed earlier than younger adults.
  • Seniors who live alone or lack social interaction throughout the day may find it difficult to fall asleep and stay asleep at night, too. Seniors also need more deep sleep due to changes in their circadian rhythms over time.

Medical Conditions That Can Cause Sleep Problems in Seniors

Seniors may find it difficult to sleep because their bodies produce less of a hormone that helps people fall asleep. It’s possible this problem is due to the fact they are aging and, as such, release fewer hormones than younger adults do or don’t produce enough melatonin at night-time.

The aging process doesn’t just affect the way we feel, but also how our body functions. For instance, an older person’s circadian rhythm shifts as they age, so that sleep is more prevalent in their early evenings and less plentiful later on. This shift makes them tired earlier at night which causes a greater tendency for bedtime near sundown and those who are still awake first thing when morning comes around will have trouble sleeping because of it!

Insomnia can be a debilitating issue for the elder population, and it is often linked to an underlying medical or psychological problem. A lack of healthy sleep not only affects seniors’ overall health but also their cognitive functioning in ways that may make them more vulnerable than they already are as elderly citizens.

Tips to Help You Fall Asleep

Here are some tips that might seniors to fall asleep faster –

Good sleep routine

Seniors should maintain a regular sleep routine including going to bed at the same time each evening and waking up naturally. Seniors should also make sure they are getting enough exercise during the day and avoiding naps in the late afternoon or early evening

Maintain active social life

Seniors who live alone often struggle with insomnia, but staying connected with friends is important for their health. Seniors may be less motivated than younger adults to keep an active social life because it’s harder for them to get around independently as easily as people of other ages do. However, seniors can stay involved by joining groups or volunteering. Seniors also need more deep sleep than younger adults due to changes in their circadian rhythm over time, so getting enough restful REM sleep each night becomes even more critical when seniors age

Adjusting medications

Seniors should speak with a doctor about adjusting any prescription drugs that may be interfering with natural sleeping patterns and talk to an occupational therapist if they have difficulties falling asleep because of physical pain or other medical conditions

Take naps

Seniors who are struggling to fall asleep at night might try taking naps during the day for a few hours instead of trying to stay up late. Seniors require seven hours of uninterrupted, restful sleep each night just like everyone else but many don’t get that much these days – it is estimated that seniors sleep about one hour less than they did fifty years ago

Take care of your health

Seniors should make sure to have a good diet and exercise regularly, which can help regulate the natural release of melatonin. Seniors who maintain healthy habits are more likely to enjoy better quality sleep night after night!

Lifestyle Changes

Seniors who are struggling with sleep problems should make some lifestyle changes to see if they can help regulate their natural release of melatonin. Seniors might want to avoid drinking caffeine or alcohol before bedtime as these substances prevent the brain from releasing enough melatonin, which will leave seniors feeling restless at night.

Last modified: August 2, 2021
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